Date: March 31, 2017

Under investigation, Trump calls for Flynn to have immunity from prosecution

On February 13, then-national security advisor Michael Flynn resigned and/or was fired by the Trump administration after the Washington Post reported that he had spoken to the Russian ambassador about lifting sanctions at the same time Obama was implementing sanctions against Russia for interfering in the U.S. election.

On March 20, FBI Director James Comey confirmed the FBI was investigating Trump associates to see if there had been any coordination with Russia.

Now Donald Trump is calling for Flynn to be given immunity from prosecution:

Trump tries to deny reality at every point. For many weeks after the FBI and CIA had confirmed that Russia hacked into Clinton-related emails, Trump claimed they hadn’t and even compared the CIA to Nazis. He has lied about many simple topics, including how many electoral votes he won. So now he keeps saying there is no kind of legitimate investigation happening.

In his testimony before Congress, Comey said, “The FBI, as part of our counterintelligence effort, is investigating the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 president election. That includes, investigating the nature of any links between associates of the Trump campaign and the Russian government and whether there was any coordination between the campaigning the Russian effort.”

However, Trump has previously suggested that anyone who asks for immunity must be guilty. At a campaign rally on September 27, he said, “If you’re not guilty of a crime, what do you need immunity for?”

In fact, he raised this line of thinking on immunity multiple times:

If one were to follow Trump’s logic, he or she would wonder why Flynn’s lawyer is trying to get immunity and why Trump thinks he should.

Korea’s impeached president Park Geun-hye arrested

Does the law apply to presidents?

Former president Park Geun-hye, who was removed from office on March 10, was arrested this morning, South Korea time, in connection to the corruption scandal that caused her impeachment. She is facing 13 potential charges, and she can be held for up to 20 days before she must be either released or indicted. She is suspected of having coerced companies like Samsung to donate US$70 million to groups linked to her aide, Choi Soon-sil, who has also been arrested, in exchange for providing political favors.

Park becomes the latest in a long line of disgraced ex-Korean presidents.

The last time South Korean presidents were arrested was 1995, when Chun Doo-hwan and his successor Roh Tae-woo were charged and convicted in relation to the coup that brought Chun to power and the Gwangju Massacre of 1980, a military suppression of a protest-turned-riot that killed hundreds. Both were pardoned in December 1997, in an effort to bring reconciliation to the young democracy.

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