Category: U.S. Politics (Page 1 of 25)

Blatt: Election night analysis

Two years after Donald Trump surprised the world and won the United States presidential election, Trump and the Republicans lost control of Congress. Trump’s radical positions and vitriolic rhetoric turned suburbanites in highly-educated districts against the Republican Party.

The results of the election show that it is hard for Republicans to simultaneously appeal to the anti-immigrant, anti-politics base that got Trump elected while also maintaining the support of traditional upper-class economically fiscal conservatives. The electorates in places like Virginia’s 10th district in the suburbs of Washington, DC, Florida’s 27th, outside of Miami, Pennsylvania’s 18th in the outskirts of Pittsburgh, and Kansas’s 3rd, outside of Kansas City, are too sophisticated to fall for Trump’s fear-mongering.

In the final days of the election, Trump dialed up the hate and smears. He grabbed onto the news about a “caravan” of migrants marching from Honduras to the U.S.-Mexican border, seeking asylum, and lied that it was full of terrorists and criminals. He released an ad that was deemed so racist that the news networks CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News refused to air it—not even for money.

Slate’s Jim Newell pointed out that Trump’s final campaign push might have energized his base in already conservative states. If that is the case, then it could have been one factor in helping the Republicans maintain control of the Senate, where they needed to win whole states.

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Conservative bloggers really hate California

Reliably, on many conservative blogs, you can find articles about how much California sucks.

The state with the 8th highest GDP per capita, which is the 25th best state for business and 31st best state to live in just really sucks. And, of course that is because it has Democratic politicians in office!

There’s about 13,000 articles about California at HotAir.com, but what’s funny about this one is that their narrative of GOP dominance in neighboring states just got crushed this week:

And where do these departing economic refugees go? To Arizona and Nevada, lower-tax places that have had — oh, look — Republican governments. And also Texas, another place stuck with GOP officeholders. California has exported more than 400,000 folks there this century.

“[Democrat] Sinema widens lead over McSally in Arizona Senate race”
“Democrats pick up Senate seat in Nevada with Rosen win”
“Longtime Texas Rep. [Republican] Pete Sessions loses to ex-NFL player”
“How the race between Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke became the closest in Texas in 40 years”

Liz Mair has more to say at The Daily Beast: “Don’t Look Now, but the Mountain West Is Turning Blue”

And I will add that HotAir conspicuously left Colorado off its list of states that Californians are “fleeing” to; it is really one of the biggest sources and much higher on the quality of life lists than Arizona, Nevada or California.

Dear Republicans: Trump hates you

Why do Republicans continue to stand for Trump attacking them, disrespecting them, disgracing their party and helping them lose elections?

Just one day after Americans rebuked Trump, handing a House majority to the Democratic Party at a time when the unemployment rate is below 4 percent, Trump celebrated the defeat of Republicans on his enemies list.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

You had some that decided to, ‘Let’s stay away. Let’s stay away.’ They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it. But Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia. I think she could have won that race, but she didn’t want to have any embrace. Peter Roskam didn’t want the embrace. Erik Paulsen didn’t want the embrace.

These Republicans lost their seats because they were too close to Trump; they were in the same party as him! Trump is a cancer to the educated, affluent, cultured suburban districts they represent.

Barbara Comstock represented Virginia’s 10th district, outside of Washington, DC, the district with the second-highest median income in the country. Hillary Clinton won Comstock’s district by 10 points.

Trump actually did decide to embrace Erik Paulsen, who represented suburbs of Minneapolis. As Politico reported,

He tried repeatedly to distance himself from Trump—whose approval rating in the 3rd District tumbled into the 30s this fall—but it was little use: Phillips branded him as a rubber-stamp for the White House, while the president himself was so irritated by Paulsen’s lack of loyalty that he insisted on sending not one but two tweets endorsing him.

So the guy Trump endorsed lost. And Trump seemingly sent endorsements his way just to make his reelection harder for him. Trump is such an egomaniac that he would rather hand over control of the mechanisms of House investigations of the president to Democrats than to see a Republican who doesn’t kiss his ass at every turn win election.

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Trump’s Demagoguery actualized

Donald Trump talked a lot about his contempt for the free press and how he would like to deny broadcast licenses, “open up” libel laws and raise taxes on his enemies, like Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

Republicans unenthusiastic about having to defend Trump but nonetheless still in favor of Trump-Republican policies often responded by shrugging their shoulders and saying that Trump’s frequent blowups are just words and that he can’t actually implement them. It would be unconstitutional, for example, to levy taxes on one particular individual just because you don’t like the newspaper he is involved in owning.

It is also unconstitutional for a president to appoint an Attorney General, a cabinet-level position, without Senate confirmation. But that’s just what Trump did on Wednesday when, the day after the election, he fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and “appointed” Matthew G. Whitaker, a partisan Republican who opposes the Mueller investigation, without Senate approval.

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Brett Kavanaugh and burdens of proof

Brett Kavanaugh is credibly accused of attempting to rape a girl while at a party in high school. It does not need to be said that we don’t know for sure if he did it–that much is obvious. Probably only a few people will ever know for sure.

But the many people attempting to defend Kavanaugh and cast doubt on the accusations have no basis on which to say the accuser is “lying.” They similarly do not know.

Kavanaugh is facing confirmation to the highest court in the land. He is facing a job interview. He is not facing a trial. If he loses, he returns to his lifetime job as a judge at the level of the U.S. district court. He will not be deprived of his life or liberty.

The National Review‘s David French, however, stated on Twitter, “We cannot and must not abandon the notion that an accuser bears the burden of proof. It’s not enough to raise suspicion. If you make a claim, you have to support it at the very least with your sworn testimony.”

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Sen. Van Hollan and Merkley protest Kavanaugh nomination

WASHINGTON, DC, SEPT. 6, 2018: Democratic Senators Jeff Merkley (Ore.) and Chris Van Hollan (Md.) broadcast from outside the Supreme Court on the afternoon of Thursday, September 6 to oppose the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Both senators pointed to Kavanaugh’s conservative beliefs and jurisprudence, the effect his rulings could have on abortion rights and universal access to healthcare (and Obamacare), and his expansive views on presidential power.

Van Hollan said, “When it comes to his views on executive power, he’s an extremist. … That’s why Trump picked him.”

Kavanaugh has expressed deference to presidential power in the past. In a 2009 article in the Minnesota Law Review, he wrote, “We should not burden a sitting President with civil suits, criminal investigations, or criminal prosecutions.” In 1999, Kavanaugh expressed skepticism of the historic ruling in US v Nixon, which forced Nixon to produce his White House tapes. Would Justice Kavanaugh vote to force Trump to respond to a subpoena by Mueller? That’s their concern.

Merkley and Van Hollen also referenced emails leaked to the New York Times showing Kavanaugh was skeptical of whether Roe v Wade should be treated as established law. Not only does that put abortion rights at risk, they said, the lack of transparency and vetting in the confirmation process, in which documents have been reviewed by a Republican lawyer before being released, is worrying.

Kavanaugh has not answered questions about his particular views on abortion or executive power, refusing to take a position on what he calls “hypotheticals.”

Rincon: If Rafael “Ted” Cruz is going to attack “Beto” O’Rourke for his name, here’s a response…

We have long strong traditions down in Texas. Our culture is the melding of many cultures-Mexican (which itself is a melding of Spanish and Indigenous), Irish, Czech, Polish, and a slew of African cultures, which due to the cruelty of the white man throughout history, get boiled down to Black. We have a way of co-opting you if you decide to migrate to this country. We’ll take you and put a new name on you.

But if you’ve got a hankering on coming down to the Lone Star State and changing it, you will face opposition. It may be good change they’re trying to bring—like that of the carpetbaggers during Reconstruction, or the Texians led by Sam Houston in the infancy of our short lived Republic—but we ain’t gonna just roll over for anything.

Oddly enough, time and politics have gone full circle. In what was once a bastion of Conservative Democrats (entirely white), fighting off encroaching “Radical Republicans” (mixed ethnicities, but still mostly white) in the 1860s-1870s, but had previously been Mexicanos fighting off encroaching Gringos in the 1830s, the two parties do-si-doed with each other so much that I actually thought there was a slight chance that the GOP could swing to the left of the Democrats with the election of Trump (this was during his campaign for the White House when there was still a sliver of hope that his campaign promises to the working class weren’t all lies).

Now we have a GOP incumbent who has definite Cuban roots, but shuns his Spanish first name running in a state with rapidly changing demographics i.e. going from majority white to majority-minority and then quickly to majority Hispanic. Cruz, following in the footsteps of La Malinche, the Indigenous woman who helped advise and interpret for Cortés as he conquered the Aztec Empire, is one of the leading opponents of immigration reform, the Dream Act and an ally of Trump’s racist and anti-immigrant agenda.

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Exclusive: The scene at Lafayette Park and marching with the counterprotesters

Lafayette Square was filled with protesters hours before the alt-right began marching towards the White House—counterprotesters, that is.

Pre-march

The counterprotesters consisted of a diverse group of people. Many were individuals who simply opposed racism who didn’t appear to be aligned with any specific group. Many were centrists or moderate liberals. One man who wore a NATO flag as a cape said, “I like to piss off both sides. I oppose fascism and communism.”

There was no shortage of hardcore activists and far-left ideologues, as well. Activist groups organized around communism, socialism, anarchism and “racial justice” all sent large contingencies.

At 12:20 pm, a group of black rights activists came marching down 16 Street NW carrying signs and chanting. Among the groups represented on their shirts and signs were Black Lives Matter, Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) and the Party for Socialism & Liberation (pslweb.org). Black protesters marched in front, followed by white allies. The Revolutionary Communist Party, A.N.S.W.E.R. and Refuse Fascism.org had organized protesters into the park, too, by then.

The park was divided in half—counterprotesters were allowed to fill the northern half, alt-right racists in the southern half. The counterprotest site was a cacophony of chanting and speeches by anti-racists, including Daryle Lamont Jenkins of One People’s Project.

The alt-right arrives

But the real action was along the orange line of the Metro.

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Alt-right marches to Lafayette Park (Unite the Right 2 photos)

Outnumbered by police officers. Outnumbered by journalists. Heavily outnumbered by counterprotesters.

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Revolutionary Communists, Black supremacists, leftists counterprotest noone

Alt-right doesn’t show up to its own protest on first day

The alt-right is coming to Washington, DC to rally outside of Donald Trump’s home in the White House for the anniversary of the bloody Unite the Right event of 2017.

Well, they should be coming tomorrow, Sunday, August 12. They didn’t end up showing on August 11. The 2017 event took place between August 11 and 12.

Counter-protesters had been taking part in an #OccupyLafayettePark protest ever since August 9, in addition to “Impeach Trump” protesters who had already been gathered outside the White House most evenings since July 17. The counter-protest contingency (and the media) was really hoping to give the alt-right an early welcome on Saturday evening, but did not get the chance.

Reporters had been camped out in Lafayette Park since morning. Some had even done shots there Friday night. Rumor swirled Saturday that alt-right supporters would make their first entrance Saturday at 5 pm. Later the time was said to be 5:30 pm.

At 5 pm, a group of black supremacists arrived with a pan-African flag and shield.

They accused “whites” of causing and/or being complicit in crimes of humanity.

“He has killed more than any other man on planet earth. Not only did he bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki and Japan, he started blazing the fire in Vietnam.”

They left after 15 minutes or so.

The anticipation grew.

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