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Dear Republicans: Trump hates you

Why do Republicans continue to stand for Trump attacking them, disrespecting them, disgracing their party and helping them lose elections?

Just one day after Americans rebuked Trump, handing a House majority to the Democratic Party at a time when the unemployment rate is below 4 percent, Trump celebrated the defeat of Republicans on his enemies list.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

You had some that decided to, ‘Let’s stay away. Let’s stay away.’ They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it. But Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia. I think she could have won that race, but she didn’t want to have any embrace. Peter Roskam didn’t want the embrace. Erik Paulsen didn’t want the embrace.

These Republicans lost their seats because they were too close to Trump; they were in the same party as him! Trump is a cancer to the educated, affluent, cultured suburban districts they represent.

Barbara Comstock represented Virginia’s 10th district, outside of Washington, DC, the district with the second-highest median income in the country. Hillary Clinton won Comstock’s district by 10 points.

Trump actually did decide to embrace Erik Paulsen, who represented suburbs of Minneapolis. As Politico reported,

He tried repeatedly to distance himself from Trump—whose approval rating in the 3rd District tumbled into the 30s this fall—but it was little use: Phillips branded him as a rubber-stamp for the White House, while the president himself was so irritated by Paulsen’s lack of loyalty that he insisted on sending not one but two tweets endorsing him.

So the guy Trump endorsed lost. And Trump seemingly sent endorsements his way just to make his reelection harder for him. Trump is such an egomaniac that he would rather hand over control of the mechanisms of House investigations of the president to Democrats than to see a Republican who doesn’t kiss his ass at every turn win election.

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Trump’s Demagoguery actualized

Donald Trump talked a lot about his contempt for the free press and how he would like to deny broadcast licenses, “open up” libel laws and raise taxes on his enemies, like Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

Republicans unenthusiastic about having to defend Trump but nonetheless still in favor of Trump-Republican policies often responded by shrugging their shoulders and saying that Trump’s frequent blowups are just words and that he can’t actually implement them. It would be unconstitutional, for example, to levy taxes on one particular individual just because you don’t like the newspaper he is involved in owning.

It is also unconstitutional for a president to appoint an Attorney General, a cabinet-level position, without Senate confirmation. But that’s just what Trump did on Wednesday when, the day after the election, he fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and “appointed” Matthew G. Whitaker, a partisan Republican who opposes the Mueller investigation, without Senate approval.

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Korean court ruling on compensation for forced labour to hurt relations with Japan

The Japan-Korea relationship, already strained by the ‘comfort women’ controversy, faces new challenges after a Korean court ruled in favor of workers coerced to work for Nippon Steel during Japan’s 35-year occupation of Korea.

Japan resists further demands for compensation or new apologies related to its colonialism and war in Asia. It views the 1965 Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea as having settled all controversies. But controversies continue to spring back up time and time again.

In 2015, Japan arrived at agreement with Korea on a plan to compensate Korea and its few remaining ‘comfort women’ with 1 billion yen (US$8 million) in exchange for “permanently” settling the issue. But after the Korean government refused to remove statues of ‘comfort women’ set up outside the Japanese diplomatic offices in Seoul and Busan, Japan threatened to withhold the money.

Korea’s new president Moon Jae-in threatened to try to renegotiate the ‘comfort women’ agreement, as he (and a majority of Koreans) opposed it. He felt it did not account for the wishes of the living former sex slaves and that Japan hadn’t apologizes forcefully enough. Japan, for its part, feels that Korea is always moving the goalposts.

Earlier in October, Japan did not participate in an international naval review held in Korea after Korea demanded that Japan’s navy remove its ‘Rising Sun’ flag. Japan had participated in fleet reviews before with that flag–the same flag it flew during World War II–but Korea apparently raised the issue strenuously this time because anti-Japan sentiment has been running high in recent years.

The ruling by Korea’s Supreme Court came 13 years after the case was first filed in Korean courts. The claimants, who were forced to work in the Japanese steel industry and had compensation withheld, originally filed in Japan, but their case was dismissed by Japanese courts in 1997 on the grounds that the 1965 treaty addressed compensation.

The treaty’s terms on individual compensation were limited, causing it to be unpopular in Korea, but it did call for Japan to provide $800 million to Korea in economic development. Japan provided that much and much more in additional investment and aid. Japan’s aid and investment was important, but not sufficient, for Korea’s development during the 1960’s and 70’s. (Ironically, many Koreans even resent Japan for sometimes trying to take too much credit for Korea’s development.)

Dining with Gov. Choi at the South Korea vs North Korea soccer game

This week, the DPRK youth soccer team crossed the 38th parallel and entered a province divided in two for a showdown against the Republic of Korea. The Fifth U-15 International Football Games for the Ari Sports Cup, currently taking place in Chuncheon, Gangwon province, are meant to continue the wellspring of good feelings started by the South inviting the North to the 2018 Olympic Games held in Pyeongchang in February.

Bombs + Dollars reporter Patrick Rincon was present for the match and spoke to Gangwon Governor Choi Moon-soon before the game. As governor of a province divided in two as a result of war, Choi is heavily involved in reconciliation endeavors.

He was instrumental in getting these games going and even in inviting North Korea to the Pyeongchang Games in February. Everyone was initially surprised that they accepted and even more surprised by the Unified Korean hockey team. Moon-soon said that things were looking up in recent trips to Pyeongyang compared to previous trips. He cites the lack of “patriotic” anti-Western propaganda banners (which previously were more numerous than stop lights in Pyeongyang). He noted this as more harmonious outlook on the South and a view that he believes, with some cautious optimism, that Kim Jong-un fancies himself a reformer and a progressive.

The Kaesong Industrial Complex is still defunct, but he sees a real possibility of it coming back on line as there is already cooperation between the two countries—in cosmetics, boxing and golfing. Moon said there were some excellent boxers in the North and he wanted to bring them South to train and even compete against US boxers on the world stage.

As for the game, the North Korean team won, 3 – 1. They scored the first goal and it was clear from the get go that they were the superior team. It was interesting to meet some of them and converse.

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UN’s attack on French burqa ban illustrates absurdity of UNHRC

The United Nations Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) passed a resolution today condemning France’s burka ban as a violation on human rights, claiming that it is an attack on religious freedom and self-determination of these women. This is strange because last I remember, the UNHRC has Saudi Arabia, Rwanda and China as members.

If we want to improve human rights, we’ve got bigger problems than secular, religious-freedom-promoting France banning the wearing of burqas. Just look to Saudi Arabia, where men are beheaded for loving men, Christians are forced to worship behind 30 foot walls, and anyone with an Israeli stamp on their passport isn’t even allowed to enter. Rape victims are blamed for being raped, and honor killing is allowed. Women are still required to have male “guardians” to do anything for them, and the law actually requires women to wear a niqab or a burka in public.

Compulsion to wear burqas is maintained in many countries and societies not just by laws but also by social pressure. No wonder France took the action it did.

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The ideological war within Western academy

A few weeks back the world woke up to what could quite possibly be the greatest ever scandal in the modern Western academy. Three Anglo-American academics published seven hoax papers in one single year, in top-tier journals, mostly from the field of feminist and gender studies. The papers were remarkable. One of the articles literally was a paraphrase of Hitler’s Mein Kampf, albeit written in a feminist language. It got accepted in a feminist journal.

Anyone who looks up to the Western higher education model as something to be emulated, this comes as a shock and a warning. Ideological disciplines like academic feminism, gender studies, race studies, etc are not that common in other parts of the world, where primary funding for higher education still goes to science, economics and business. But with the growth of student exchanges, research collaborations, and educational departments and campuses spreading, this is a moment of reckoning.

The papers included unscientific garbage, which the hoaxers named as Grievance studies. For example, one paper mentioned fat accumulation and fat bodybuilding is a legitimate idea of health research. Another paper suggested that dog parks are grounds of patriarchy and human behaviour is observable through dogs when they exchange in carnal activities, which demonstrate power dynamics. Another paper said that feminist astrology should replace physics and astronomy. Another suggested that men should be put in chains in classrooms, as a punishment for patriarchy etc. The list goes on, and gives an idea. Unfortunately, most were either accepted or published.

This, needless to mention, is shocking. It’s unbelievable that these disciplines get funded from public tax and are taught at institutions of higher learning. One cannot imagine phrenology, craniometry, flat-earth theory or other pseudoscience will get funded like this, and yet, these disciplines are. Capital spent on these disciplines could be better spent on technology, and public welfare, instead of topics which have zero real-life relevance. However, the social cost of these disciplines is worse. These are the same disciplines which churn out young activists and students, with ideas of feminism and Me Too, and other such social change movements, which then, in turn, are spread in tech sectors and media and other professions. Some of these disciplines and courses are also made compulsory to first-year students, both domestic and foreign, which in turn act as ideological propaganda. It results in the spread of a culture and ideas, some of which will not be welcome in other parts of the globe.

Heather Mac Donald, in her latest book, The Diversity Delusion, highlights the roots to this. 

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Review: The Diversity Delusion

Until 2011, UCLA students English had to take a course in Chaucer, a couple in Shakespeare, and one in Milton as the fundamental works of English literature. Some junior faculty revolted, and UCLA promptly changed its course to studying compulsory papers in “Gender, Race, Ethnicity, Disability, and Sexuality Studies; Imperial, Transnational, and Postcolonial Studies; Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Critical Theory; or Creative Writing.”

According to the course catalog, giants of English literature were irrelevant. but students must study “alternative rubrics of gender, sexuality, race, and class.” UCLA’s undergraduates, therefore, had to choose among courses like, “Women of Color in the U.S., Women and Gender in the Caribbean, Chicana Feminism, Studies in Queer Literatures and Cultures, and Feminist and Queer Theory.”

Likewise, at Columbia University, a black music undergraduate rebelled against the classics. “Why did I have to listen in music humanities to this Mozart? My problem with the core is that it upholds the premises of white supremacy and racism. It’s a racist core. Who is this Mozart, this Haydn, these superior white men? There are no women, no people of color.”

Read the rest HERE.

Brett Kavanaugh and burdens of proof

Brett Kavanaugh is credibly accused of attempting to rape a girl while at a party in high school. It does not need to be said that we don’t know for sure if he did it–that much is obvious. Probably only a few people will ever know for sure.

But the many people attempting to defend Kavanaugh and cast doubt on the accusations have no basis on which to say the accuser is “lying.” They similarly do not know.

Kavanaugh is facing confirmation to the highest court in the land. He is facing a job interview. He is not facing a trial. If he loses, he returns to his lifetime job as a judge at the level of the U.S. district court. He will not be deprived of his life or liberty.

The National Review‘s David French, however, stated on Twitter, “We cannot and must not abandon the notion that an accuser bears the burden of proof. It’s not enough to raise suspicion. If you make a claim, you have to support it at the very least with your sworn testimony.”

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100% of headlines on People’s Daily about Xi Jinping

From September 3-4, Beijing has hosted the 2018 China-Africa Forum. Headlines from the summit continue to dominate the news in China.

On the front page of the People’s Daily from September 5 to 7, 100 percent of the headlines were about Xi Jinping.

Typical were headlines like this from September 6:

Xi Jinping meets Nigeria president Buhari
Xi Jinping meets Madagascar president Hery
Xi Jinping meets Chad president Déby

The entire front page of the paper on September 6 used the same structure for each of the ten headlines in the main section.

Since Xi Jinping took power, he has been glorified more than any Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. A Reddit user with 36,000 “karma points” who frequently presents charts has used data from people.com.cn to show that Xi is mentioned on the front page of the People’s Daily more than any leader since Mao.

And since Xi became president for life at the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, he has been mentioned almost every day.

Chinese citizens are being arrested for vandalizing propaganda of Xi.

Now the question might be not how many days is Xi featured on the front page, but how many times in one day.

Sources for charts:
Xi Jinping is being mentioned almost every single day on People’s Daily front-page headlines, something only Mao had done during the cultural revolution. (1949-2018)
Is Xi Jinping mentioned in a headline of the People’s Daily front page today? (2007-2018)

Sen. Van Hollan and Merkley protest Kavanaugh nomination

WASHINGTON, DC, SEPT. 6, 2018: Democratic Senators Jeff Merkley (Ore.) and Chris Van Hollan (Md.) broadcast from outside the Supreme Court on the afternoon of Thursday, September 6 to oppose the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Both senators pointed to Kavanaugh’s conservative beliefs and jurisprudence, the effect his rulings could have on abortion rights and universal access to healthcare (and Obamacare), and his expansive views on presidential power.

Van Hollan said, “When it comes to his views on executive power, he’s an extremist. … That’s why Trump picked him.”

Kavanaugh has expressed deference to presidential power in the past. In a 2009 article in the Minnesota Law Review, he wrote, “We should not burden a sitting President with civil suits, criminal investigations, or criminal prosecutions.” In 1999, Kavanaugh expressed skepticism of the historic ruling in US v Nixon, which forced Nixon to produce his White House tapes. Would Justice Kavanaugh vote to force Trump to respond to a subpoena by Mueller? That’s their concern.

Merkley and Van Hollen also referenced emails leaked to the New York Times showing Kavanaugh was skeptical of whether Roe v Wade should be treated as established law. Not only does that put abortion rights at risk, they said, the lack of transparency and vetting in the confirmation process, in which documents have been reviewed by a Republican lawyer before being released, is worrying.

Kavanaugh has not answered questions about his particular views on abortion or executive power, refusing to take a position on what he calls “hypotheticals.”

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